Hazardous tree inspection for TPO

NWS Aborist Jim Allitt recently advised on the management of a substantial oak tree subject to a Tree Preservation Order and within the Broads National Park.

Our client, Mr Coleman, had concerns over the extent of deadwood in the canopy, especially where it was close to his and a neighbouring property, but as also keen to retain it as a beautiful feature of his home.

Mr Coleman asked NWS to determine the condition of the tree and make future management recommendations. The tree was surveyed to look at issues such as weak unions or forks, cavities, and especially any defects hidden higher in the canopy.

Hazard tree feature – Branch failure

Sometimes hazards are obvious but subtler hazards may go unnoticed and mechanical failure may occur without specialist management.

Under the Occupiers’ Liability Act (1957 and 1984) the ‘occupier of the land’ where the tree is rooted has a duty of care to ‘take reasonable steps to prevent or minimise the risk of personal injury or damage to property’, both for visitors to the occupiers land (1057) and other persons (1984). The law is quite complicated.

To avoid or deal with risks while retaining the tree, a reasonable and balanced approach to future management requirements is needed, with a full understanding of calculated risk involved. In this case, NWS suggested a 2m, crown reduction and to clear larger deadwood from the canopy so that ‘sailing’ from the wind stressed the branch unions less.

Aerial tree inspection by Jim

Since the tree was protected, the works had to be agreed with the local planning authority, the Broads Authority. NWS’s successful application demonstrated that the works retained the screening the tree provided but were also necessary to reduce the risk the tree posed to the adjacent house and property.

Trees as assets : 7 rules for designing with trees

Trees on a site increase visual attractiveness, are great for wildlife and add considerably to property values. Maximising use of existing tree assets in designs will maximise the financial benefits for new developments. Here are NWS’s 7 tips:

  1. To maximise value from tree assets start at the concept stage; here a simple tree survey will suffice: a ‘Tree Constraints Plan’ with ‘Root Protection Areas’ (RPA).
  2. RPAs are minimum core areas to protect your trees; seek specialist advice if RPA conflicts with your design as to whether redesign is required.
  3. On sites with many trees, use BS5837 categorisation to prioritise the importance of individual trees, based on amenity, wildlife and landscape value.
  4. Allow room for future growth based on tree’s longevity; shading plans help design building orientation and fenestration.
  5. Allow for “hidden” issues for trees such as visibility splays, drainage (esp SUDS) and utility connection; trees with faults may need intervention to help them.
  6. An Arboricultural Impact Assessment (AIA) will help when instructing the contractor to protect trees plus organise site clearance, construction and final landscaping and planting.
  7. Find an arborist you can work with, seek their advice early and get their regular input.

If you are interested in how much your trees might add in value to your site, there are various techniques from the Capital Asset Value for Amenity Trees (CAVAT) through to ecosystem services calculations.

Jim calculates a tree’s RPA

 

What does NPPF say about ecology or wildlife ?

National Planning and Policy Framework has quite extensive consideration of ecology and wildlife, including the need for a landscape scale approach to planning and for wildlife gain during development.  We find it quite a big document to download, so the following are the relevant extracts from the National Planning and Policy Framework. We have added in titles for ease of navigation. Continue reading

850 new homes for client at Bradwell

NWS’ work with Bidwells for Persimmon Homes has helped to secure planning permission for 850 new homes, a school, shops and business space at Bradwell near Great Yarmouth.

The urban edge site required a full Environmental Impact Assessment for its effects on wildlife, including wintering and breeding birds, grass snakes and bats, as well as design work to ensure maximum benefit for local ecology and people through the inclusion of green corridors using footpaths and open spaces provision. NWS carried out their work to a tight schedule and on-budget, identifying site issues and constraints early on, preventing costly reworking of the master plan later.

Furthermore due to the closeness to several internationally protected site, a Habitat Regulations Assessment was requested by Natural England. NWS were able to satisfy the local planing authority that with careful design for Suitable Alternative Natural Greenspace on the site, that there would be no attributable additional recreational pressure on breeding Little Terns on the North Denes SPA.

The site was granted permission by a unanimous decision of the planning committee on Tuesday 23 May 2014.  More from the Great Yarmouth Mercury…..